Adaptogenic Miso Soup

Miso soup

I’ve always enjoyed a little “funk” in my food. Shout-out to any and all fermented veggies, home-made vegan cheeses, wild mushrooms, brine-y olives and what some would call… excessive… amounts of garlic and onion.

I could probably sit and devour an entire jar of kimchi in one sitting….

Anyway.

This soup is salty, spicy, umami and, most importantly, full of minerals and beneficial properties.

You can play around with it and add pretty much whatever you like: Green onion, steamed veggies, leafy greens like spinach or kale, the possibilities are endless!

I kept it pretty simple with this one, mainly because I’m partial to the purity of plain miso broth, and I wanted this to be more of a sipping broth/in-between meals kind of situation.

You can also experiment with different kinds of miso paste such as brown rice, red or sweet white miso. I use chickpea miso for most of my recipes, because it has a saltier, milder, less sweet flavor than other miso pastes I’ve tried.

For this soup, I use whole dried cordyceps mushroom.

Cordyceps is a wonderful medicinal mushroom, boasting countless benefits including the support of lung health, adrenal balance, stress response, immune system function and energy utilization.

Cordyceps is a Jing-nourishing herb, making it wonderful for those with drained energy reserves. You could eat this soup for breakfast as well, especially with the mild energy you may experience from this mushroom.

One interesting thing to note about cordyceps mushroom is that it typically grows on insects and larvae by taking over the brain and central nervous system, causing the host to act in accordance with the fungi’s biological agenda.

cordyceps mushroom

Luckily, the cordyceps mushrooms I use are not grown on insects but organic brown rice, making them vegan-friendly. Yay!

They have a very mushroom-y flavor, which I personally really enjoy in this soup. The hot broth softens them up as well, which makes eating them much more pleasant.

If you can’t find whole cordyceps mushrooms, you could substitute them with 1/4 tsp cordyceps mushroom extract powder.

One last thing to note about this recipe is that when making miso soup, it’s best not to heat the miso to extreme temperatures due to its high enzyme and probiotic content. I usually use water that’s just the perfect sipping temperature to make this recipe. It very easily remains raw by keeping temperatures under 118° F.

This recipe is super quick, and only takes as long as it takes your water to heat up.

Ingredients:

12 oz hot but not boiling filtered or spring water 
1 tsp (or a hefty pinch) dried cordyceps mushroom strands
1 tbsp chickpea miso paste 
1/4 tsp aged garlic extract
1 tbsp dried wakame seaweed
3/4 tsp tamari
1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil (optional)
1 tsp fresh lime or lemon juice
1/2 tsp kimchi juice or your favorite fermented hot sauce to taste
1 tsp toasted sesame seeds for garnish (optional)

Directions:

  1. Begin by adding miso paste, along with all ingredients – besides the seaweed, sesame seeds and cordyceps mushrooms – to your favorite mug or bowl.
  2. Add a splash of cold water and mix vigorously until a smooth paste is achieved.
  3. Add the mushrooms and seaweed to the broth base.
  4. Pour the hot water over the rest of the ingredients and stir gently to combine.
  5. Top with extra sesame oil and sesame seeds for garnish.

Enjoy! ❤


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